Awareness to Handle Research and Healthcare Waste (RHCW) in teaching and research institutes; a comprehensive review

Authors

  • Naveed Munir 1School of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Campus, University of Management and Technology, Lahore
  • Muhammad Naveed Afzal School of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Campus, University of Management and Technology, Lahore
  • Zahed Mahmood Department of Biochemistry, Government College University, Faisalabad
  • Umar Bacha School of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Campus, University of Management and Technology, Lahore
  • Syeda Saira Iqbal School of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Campus, University of Management and Technology, Lahore
  • Qurat ul Ain School of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Campus, University of Management and Technology, Lahore
  • Awais Imdad Khan School of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Campus, University of Management and Technology, Lahore
  • Amber Yaseen School of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Campus, University of Management and Technology, Lahore

Keywords:

Environmental pollution, wastes, infectious, hazardous, handling, safe strategies

Abstract

Environmental pollution has become the major challenge not only for developing countries but also for developed ones Worldwide. The major goal of this comprehensive review is to compile the reference data regarding the different types of waste generated in teaching, research, and healthcare institutes and specific strategy to manage such wastes. In addition to the pharmaceutical, leather, chemicals, food, and paper industries, teaching, research, and healthcare institutions are also significant sources of different types of Non-hazardous as well as hazardous wastes. Therefore, a simple and implementable guideline for cleaning and waste disposal services in such institutions requires strict adherence to applicable policies and procedures. Research and healthcare waste (RHCW) management is a joint effort among Research Laboratory Personnel, Healthcare facilitators, Building Services Personnel, and Local Environmental Health and Safety Personnel. As Pakistan is among the developing countries situated in South Asia, most of the institutes, including teaching, research, and healthcare, try to follow the WHO guidance or manage hazardous and non-hazardous wastes with self-planned strategies. Although most of the local Governing bodies and Institutional bodies are trying to handle the wastes at their levels by following different protocols, introducing a protocol at the National level is the need of the current era to fight against environmental pollutants.

 

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Published

2022-03-31

How to Cite

Munir, N., Afzal, M. N., Mahmood, Z., Bacha, U., Iqbal, S. S., Ain, Q. ul, Khan, A. I., & Yaseen, A. (2022). Awareness to Handle Research and Healthcare Waste (RHCW) in teaching and research institutes; a comprehensive review. International Journal of Natural Medicine and Health Sciences, 1(2). Retrieved from https://journals.iub.edu.pk/index.php/ijnms/article/view/758